Boonies LCPA problem

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Boonies LCPA problem

Postby lisa553 » Saturday May 24, 2014 3:29 pm

Hey guys, I tried boonies LCPA Recipe for the first time today and I think I made a mistake. I'm used to kits and I put the malt and draught onto boil then added the hops. It mixed up fine but when I saw how dark it turned I started looking up if I did it right and evidently I didn't.

1) will it be ok? Or taste weird?
2) next time I just mix it all up in the fermenter with some hot water right and boil the hops separately then add to the mix?

Thanks for your help!
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Re: Boonies LCPA problem

Postby jello » Sunday May 25, 2014 7:40 am

Should taste fine.
I don't think the method you used is going to change the colour of the beer. Unless somehow you burnt it. Just have to wait and see how it turns out.
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Re: Boonies LCPA problem

Postby warra48 » Sunday May 25, 2014 5:20 pm

It will all lighten up as you dilute it into the fermenter.

Provided you used the standard ingredients, there won't be a problem.

Relax, and go and have a beer. Boonie's LCPA is a great recipe. Trust it and go for it.
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Re: Boonies LCPA problem

Postby weizgei » Monday May 26, 2014 2:56 pm

Did you put all the malt extract into a small pot and boil it up? If so that would likely end up scorching the malt as it would be a hugely dense liquid in anything less than say a 10 litre pot.

You should also avoid boiling any pre-hopped kit components of the recipe, as they've already been through the boil process. The optimal choice is to only boil up enough unhopped malt extract to get to a boil gravity of around 1040, which is about 130 grams of LME (liquid malt extract) for every litre of water. And to ensure the optimal extraction of the good stuff in your hops, you want to boil them in 8 litres or more if possible.

Best bet is to grab a 20l pot from Big W for around $20, and do an 11 litre boil with all of a 1.5kg can of un-hopped LME. Once you've boiled your hops up in that, pour it into the fermenter and add all your other ingredients on top.
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Re: Boonies LCPA problem

Postby lisa553 » Monday May 26, 2014 11:42 pm

Hey, it was a pretty big pot and I put the draught in with it too. It went very dark, but didn't burn. Tastes very sweet, almost caramelised. In the fermenter it looks like a stout haha. Might just bottle instead of keggging and keep it as back up.
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Re: Boonies LCPA problem

Postby weizgei » Tuesday May 27, 2014 10:33 am

Yep, too much extract in too little water. Try to always keep it under 1.3 litres of liquid extract (1kg dry) for every 10 litres of water, or it'll tend to caramelise as you say.
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Re: Boonies LCPA problem

Postby Pogierob » Tuesday May 27, 2014 4:16 pm

I just received this today and thought it might suit this topic

Hope it helps Lisa


BeerSmith Home Brewing News

Better Beer with Late Malt Extracts

Today we look at a method for malt extract brewers that can improve the quality and color of your extract beer. Both liquid and dried malt extract beers suffer from an effect called a Maillard reaction as well as carmelization when brewing.

A Maillard reaction is a chemical reaction that occurs between amino acids and sugars in the wort, and it accentuated by the use of extract in a concentrated boil. Carmelization occurs when liquid extract or excess sugars settle to the bottom of the brew pot during the boil and the sugars carmelize (harden) in the bottom of the pot. Of the two, the Maillard reaction actually accounts for the majority of the color darkening.

This typically darkens the beer, and in extreme cases can also affect the taste of the beer. Obviously this is a problem for brewers of light colored beers. The effect is also common in high gravity beers in small brew pots because of the higher proportion of extract to water when boiling.

To avoid the ill effects of the Maillard reaction and carmelization, malt extract brewers should delay the addition of the majority of their extracts until late in the boiling process. The extract must be added late enough in the boil to avoid darkening, but early enough to assure that the extract is sterilized. Boiling the extract for about 15 minutes is a good balance.

I recommend adding a small amount of malt extract (perhaps 15-25%) early in the boil if using separate hops. The sugars and enzymes in the extract aid in extracting alpha acids (bitterness) from the hops. Boiling hops with a small amount of extract will result in smoother hop flavors and appropriate bitterness that you can't achieve with plain water alone.

Late extract additions do present one challenge for the brewer. Late extract additions increase the bitterness of the beer. Predicting the International Bitterness Units (IBUs) of late extract additions to match your target style is mathematically complex. Most brewing software and spreadsheets are simply not designed to handle multiple hop and late malt extract additions in the boil. The gravity and bitterness of the boil will vary with each ingredient added.

To do the calculation by hand you would need to calculate the gravity of the boil at each stage, bitterness contribution from each hop addition taking this gravity into account and then combine these into one overall IBU number for the brew. To compensate, some brewers use a "rule of thumb" such as "reduce hops by 20% when using late extract brews". Another method is to calculate the hops addition without the late extract and then add 5-10% more hops to compensate for lower utilization during the last 15 minutes of the boil.

BeerSmith does have a late extract option to make this calculation easier. To use the late extract option, simply check the "late extract" box when adding extracts to your recipe and specify the boil time. BeerSmith will include all of your hop additions and late extract additions into the IBU (bitterness) calculations, combining them appropriately to predict your overall bitterness (IBUs).

If you are an extract brewer, fresh extract is extremely important for making the best beer possible. You don't want to use cans of dated extract. MoreBeer has fresh malt extract at a great price, and your order via this link supports our sites.

Thank you again for your continued support!

Brad Smith
BeerSmith.com
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Re: Boonies LCPA problem

Postby lisa553 » Tuesday May 27, 2014 11:28 pm

Thanks Brad and others :) might dry hop into a keg and hope for the best
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Re: Boonies LCPA problem

Postby Boonie » Monday Jul 14, 2014 9:43 pm

Sorry Lisa, just saw this.

I don't think it will change it too much depending on your boil time....don't put the kit in in future :)

How did it taste?

Cheers

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